Keywords Abstract
Clivaz, Claire, Marion Rivoal, and Martial Sankar. "A New Platform for Editing Digital Multimedia: The eTalks." In New Avenues for Electronic Publishing in the Age of Infinite Collections and Citizen Science: Scale, Openness and Trust, 156-159. ELPUB. Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2015.

The eTalks are a new digital multimedia editing plaform developed at the University of Lausanne: their application is implemented via an easy-to-use editor interface, designed for the use of researchers themselves, to create and edit original eTalks. This permits the linking together of images, sounds and textual materials with hyperlinks, enriching it with relevant information. The final release of eTalks allows complete ‘citability’ of its contents: each and every portion of the researchers' talks can be precisely referred to and thus cited with a specific identifier, just like any traditional, paper-based scientific publication but with all the potential for plural literacies. It is openly accessible and the code is open source, including guidelines to install the eTalks. It contributes to the development of multiliteracies in the digital academic production of knowledge.

Martin, Caroline, Valérie Pagneux, and Alain Henaut. "An Open Access E-journal: How to Find Out Readers' Preferences? The Case of the “Sciences Eaux & Territoires” Journal." In New Avenues for Electronic Publishing in the Age of Infinite Collections and Citizen Science: Scale, Openness and Trust, 19-30. ELPUB. Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2015.

How may we best evaluate an open access e-journal that is not intended to be cited in rank “A” scientific journals? In this study, we took the example of a journal that connects research and professionals workers in the environmental sciences. We compared information from downloads with readership surveys. The main finding was that readers remember the best articles from a given issue and classify the issues based on this memory. A clear dichotomy can be observed: some readers are particularly interested in the management of biodiversity and pollution and others reject all that links to it.

Nisheva-Pavlova, Maria, Dicho Shukerov, and Pavel Pavlov. "Building a Social Semantic Digital Library." In New Avenues for Electronic Publishing in the Age of Infinite Collections and Citizen Science: Scale, Openness and Trust, 63-72. ELPUB. Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2015.

The paper analyzes some current trends of research and development in the field of digital libraries. The presentation is focused on the main features of two new generations of digital libraries – the so-called semantic digital libraries and social semantic digital libraries. The design characteristics, principles of functioning and some implementation details of a particular academic digital library have been discussed as an illustration of the suggested ideas.

Fresa, Antonella, Börje Justrel, Valentina Bachi, and Neil Forbes. "CIVIC EPISTEMOLOGIES – Development of a Roadmap for Citizen Researchers in the Age of Digital Culture." In New Avenues for Electronic Publishing in the Age of Infinite Collections and Citizen Science: Scale, Openness and Trust, 8-14. ELPUB. Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2015.

The CIVIC EPISTEMOLOGIES project investigates citizen science and crowdsourcing in the domain of the research in Digital Cultural Heritage and Humanities (DCHH). The ultimate aim is to produce a validated Roadmap indicating the suggested direction that the deployment of services and infrastructures should take, in order to support the participation of citizens in the research processes and the participation of creative industries in the exploitation of digital cultural content. The case of DCHH is particularly relevant because of the major cross-cutting role that the humanities play in European research and innovation, recently acknowledged in a clear way in the Horizon2020 Community Programme for Research and Innovation. Cultural heritage and humanities also represent a subject area in which citizens are particularly active, counting several – still spread - experiences of their involvement in recording, annotating and cataloguing activities on an individual or group basis, as volunteers and amateurs. The case of broadening e-Infrastructure deployment to support the participation of citizens to DCHH research, even if holding a strong impact potential for social cohesion and job development, is not yet fully explored. The paper discusses about the multidisciplinary approach to citizen science and how this method can contribute to the benefit of many scientific domains, research communities, and technology advancements as well as delivering novel social and economic impact.

Smith, Jane E., and Constance A. Rinaldo. "Collaborating on Open Science: The Journey of the Biodiversity Heritage Library." In New Avenues for Electronic Publishing in the Age of Infinite Collections and Citizen Science: Scale, Openness and Trust, 15-18. ELPUB. Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2015.

The Biodiversity Heritage Library, BHL http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/ , is an established and successful digital library, formed by a global consortium of natural history libraries, with engaged and enthusiastic users. The extensive partnerships, curated content, innovative tools and services, the ease of mining the data all combine to establish an open science resource that advances scientific progress through linking, use and reuse. The aim of BHL as stated on the web page is: “Inspiring discovery through free access to biodiversity knowledge. The Biodiversity Heritage Library works collaboratively to make biodiversity literature openly available to the world as part of a global biodiversity community. BHL also serves as the foundational literature component of the Encyclopedia of Life (EOL)”. BHL and EOL are linked via taxonomic names and bibliographies. BHL is linked in a similar way to the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) and thus has broad exposure to scientists across the globe as well as a global public.

Vlaeminck, Sven, and Lisa-Kristin Herrmann. "Data Policies and Data Archives: A New Paradigm for Academic Publishing in Economic Sciences?" In New Avenues for Electronic Publishing in the Age of Infinite Collections and Citizen Science: Scale, Openness and Trust, 145-155. ELPUB. Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2015.

In our paper we summarise the findings of an empirical study in which a sample of 346 journals in economics and business studies were examined. We regard both the extent and the quality of journals' data policies, which should facilitate replications of published empirical research. The paper presents some characteristics of journals equipped with data policies and gives some recommendations for suitable data policies in economics and business sciences journals. In addition, we also evaluate the journals' data archives to roughly estimate whether these journals really enforce data availability. Our key finding is that we are currently not able to determine a new publishing paradigm for journals in economic sciences.

Marra, Monica. "Exploration of Professional Social Networks and Opinions about Scholarly Communication Tools among Italian Astrophysicists." In New Avenues for Electronic Publishing in the Age of Infinite Collections and Citizen Science: Scale, Openness and Trust, 178-180. ELPUB. Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2015.

The poster conveys the first results of a survey conducted among astrophysicists working at INAF. Just under 120 respondents made it possible to investigate their behaviour and opinions with regard to use of some major professional social networks and preferences about some aspects of scholarly communication and evaluation.

Hoorn, Esther, and Marlon Domingus. "Finding the Law for Sharing Data in Academia." In New Avenues for Electronic Publishing in the Age of Infinite Collections and Citizen Science: Scale, Openness and Trust, 131-139. ELPUB. Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2015.

How can universities provide good advice about the legal aspects of research data management? At the same time, how can universities prevent that perceived legal risks become barriers to: conducting research, sharing research data, valorisation of research data, and control mechanisms for the purpose of scientific integrity? A Dutch expert group developed a creative approach based on some core ideas3 about regulation in the field of academic research.

Riphagen, M., M. Rasch, and F. Cramer. "From Print to Ebooks: A Hybrid Publishing Toolkit for the Arts." In New Avenues for Electronic Publishing in the Age of Infinite Collections and Citizen Science: Scale, Openness and Trust, 47-57. ELPUB. Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2015.

This article is an excerpt of the outcome of a two-year research and development project on hybrid publishing. The DPT Collective [1] developed a Toolkit which consists of the publication From Print to Ebooks: A Hybrid Publishing Toolkit for the Arts [2] and an online software kit [3] – which is meant for publishers who publish visually oriented books in mostly smaller print runs. This Toolkit focuses particularly (but not exclusively) on EPUB3 as an electronic publication format, and on Markdown [4] as a word processing format. The recommendations stem from our practical experience in collaborating on electronic publication projects with four Dutch art, design and research publishers: BISPublishers, Valiz, nai010 uitgevers and the Institute of Network Cultures.

Rettberg, Najla, Birgit Schmidt, and Anthony Ross. "Infrastructures for Policies: How OpenAIRE Supports the EC's Open Access Requirements." In New Avenues for Electronic Publishing in the Age of Infinite Collections and Citizen Science: Scale, Openness and Trust, 185-189. ELPUB. Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2015.

Recently launched, OpenAIRE2020 is an Open Access (OA) Infrastructure for Research which supports open scholarly communication and access to the research output of European funded projects. This brief paper outlines how such an infrastructure can support an OA policy, the efforts required to successfully implement the mandate and the overall benefit that an infrastructure can bring.

Handke, Christian, Lucie Guibault, and Joan-Josep Vallbé. "Is Europe Falling Behind in Data Mining? Copyright's Impact on Data Mining in Academic Research." In New Avenues for Electronic Publishing in the Age of Infinite Collections and Citizen Science: Scale, Openness and Trust, 120-130. ELPUB. Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2015.

With the diffusion of digital information technology, data mining (DM) is widely expected to increase the productivity of all kinds of research activities. Based on bibliometric data, we demonstrate that the share of DM-related research articles in all published academic papers has increased substantially over the last two decades. We develop an ordinal categorization of countries according to essential aspects of the copyright system affecting the costs and benefits of DM research. We demonstrate that countries in which data mining for academic research requires the express consent of rights holders, data mining makes up a significantly smaller share of total research output. To our knowledge, this is the first time that an empirical study identified a significant negative association between copyright protection and innovation. We also show that within countries where DM requires express consent by rights holders, there is an inverse relationship between rule of law indicators and the share of DM related articles in all research articles.

Stojanovski, Jadranka. "Journals' Editorial Policies – An Analysis of the Instructions for Authors of Croatian Open Access Journals." In New Avenues for Electronic Publishing in the Age of Infinite Collections and Citizen Science: Scale, Openness and Trust, 113-119. ELPUB. Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2015.

The growing number of publications presenting research findings, the pressure on scientists to produce publications in great quantity, and the shift in the business models of many journals increased importance of journals' editorial practices, which are well represented in guidelines for preparing the manuscript for submission. Journals have a special responsibility to protect research integrity and to keep trust in journal publishing. This study looked at information on editorial practices in the instructions for authors of Croatian Open Access journals. 283 instructions for authors from all disciplines were examined according to the broad range of publishing issues grouped in hierarchically organized categories. Mostly addressed issues were manuscript layout (276/283) and journal language (269/283). The most common ethical issues among journals from all disciplines were responsibility of author (73/283), funding (52/283), and accuracy (51/283). There are several ethical issues addressed significantly more often by biomedical journals, like responsibility of authors (14/30), publishing ethics (14/30), conflict of interest (12/30), funding (11/30), and authorship (11/30). In comparison with ethical issues common publishing issues like manuscript layout, manuscript elements, and type of paper were richly represented in journals from all disciplines.

Duke, Monica. "Lay Summaries for Research Articles: A Citizen Science Approach to Bridge the Gap in Access." In New Avenues for Electronic Publishing in the Age of Infinite Collections and Citizen Science: Scale, Openness and Trust, 1-7. ELPUB. Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2015.

The Patients Participate! project explored the feasibility of a citizen science approach to writing lay summaries for research articles. It involved a range stakeholders: funders of research (medical charities), service providers (the British Library), researchers and patients. Informed by practices within medical charities and the experiences of other citizen science projects, different methods were used to investigate trust, the skills required to produce a good lay summary, and the benefits of citizen science. A literature review into human factors was carried out and platforms for service delivery were analysed. The project was able to synthesise guidelines on participation in citizen science projects and the writing of lay summaries, and to identify challenges. This paper summarises the outcomes and lessons learned.

MacIntyre, Ross, Jo Alcock, Paul Needham, and Jo Lambert. "Measuring the Usage of Repositories via a National Standards-based Aggregation Service: IRUS-UK." In New Avenues for Electronic Publishing in the Age of Infinite Collections and Citizen Science: Scale, Openness and Trust, 83-92. ELPUB. Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2015.

Many educational institutions have repositories for research outputs. The number of items available through institutional repositories is growing, and is expected to continue to do so due to requirements for outputs from public-funded research to be open access. But how much usage are institutional repositories and their individual items getting? The Jisc-funded service IRUS-UK is designed to help institutions understand more about the usage of their institutional repositories. IRUS-UK collects raw usage data from participating repositories and processes these into COUNTER-compliant statistics. This provides repositories with comparable, authoritative, standards-based data and opportunities for profiling and benchmarking. It enables institutions to run reports at both repository level (e.g. total download figures) and at item level. IRUS-UK utilises a robust, multistage ingest process, validating data, stripping out robot and unusual accesses, and filtering out double clicks, to transform raw usage data into COUNTER-compliant statistics. IRUS-UK currently has data from 83 UK institutional repositories (using Eprints, DSpace and Fedora software) and has recorded over 35 million downloads since July 2012. The data from IRUS-UK can be used to provide information for management reporting, for usage monitoring, and for external reporting. Data can be viewed within the online portal, downloaded for further analysis, or harvested using the SUSHI service (NISO Z39.93). IRUS-UK is also working with and contributing to other groups and initiatives involved in a range of activities relating to usage statistics. These include: the Distributed Usage Logging/CrossRef DOI Event Tracker Working Group, OpenAIRE2020 and COAR Working Group.

Loizides, Fernando, George Buchanan, and Keti Mavri. "On Key Bespoke Tools to Support Electronic Academic Document Discovery." In New Avenues for Electronic Publishing in the Age of Infinite Collections and Citizen Science: Scale, Openness and Trust, 73-82. ELPUB. Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2015.

Publishing in academic journals and conferences has become faster, and easier with the ability to edit and submit documents electronically. With the increase of publications also come negative effects such as that of information overload and elevated discovery time of relevant resources. An information seeker often wades through several documents in order to find relevant publications having to either select known repositories for their search or utilizing generic search sources which network to several online repositories. Even with the advances in interactive systems, information seekers still carry out a mostly textual search from input to returned results. Several tools have been created by researchers in order to assist the seekers in their visual academic document triage activities but very few have been successfully implemented in actual discovery of electronic publications. With electronic publishing increasing dramatically, we recognize the paramount importance for these tools to be improved and integrated within environments to assist the seekers. In this work, we present an overview of key bespoke tools purpose built for achieving this document selection tasks. Using this work as a reference we hope to encourage structured and novel approaches to creating triage tools and improve the discovery process of electronic academic document publications.

Tate, Dominic. "Open Access and Research Assessment: Dealing with UK Open Access Requirements in Practice." In New Avenues for Electronic Publishing in the Age of Infinite Collections and Citizen Science: Scale, Openness and Trust, 58-62. ELPUB. Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2015.
Dimchev, Aleksandar, and Rosen Stefanov. "Open Access in Scientific Communication: Bulgaria's Current OA Policies within the International Context." In New Avenues for Electronic Publishing in the Age of Infinite Collections and Citizen Science: Scale, Openness and Trust, 93-101. ELPUB. Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2015.

The following report aims to examine the current tendencies in the field of Open Access (OA) publishing. Ever since its inception in the 1990s, Open Access has been a topic of interest in regards to its potential to be viable alternative to more traditional publishing models for scientific information and communication. This report examines OA within the context of both international practices (with a focus on European experience in the Open Access field), as well as looking at the current tendencies regarding this publishing model in Bulgaria.

Schmidt, Birgit, Birgit Gemeinholzer, and Andrew Treloar. "Open Data in Global Environmental Research: Findings from the Community." In New Avenues for Electronic Publishing in the Age of Infinite Collections and Citizen Science: Scale, Openness and Trust, 140-144. ELPUB. Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2015.

This paper presents selected findings of the Belmont Forum's survey on open data which targeted the global environmental research and data infrastructure community. It highlights users' perceptions of the term “open data”, expectations of infrastructure functionalities, and barriers and enablers for the sharing of data. Respondents also pointed out a wide range of good practice examples and a desire for enhancement and consolidation.

Shearer, Kathleen, Katharina Mueller, and Maxie Gottschling. "Reaching Out to Global Interoperability through Aligning Repository Networks." In New Avenues for Electronic Publishing in the Age of Infinite Collections and Citizen Science: Scale, Openness and Trust, 165-168. ELPUB. Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2015.

COAR is working towards greater interoperability of systems in a number of areas, with an emphasis on open access metadata elements and vocabularies. This paper presents the outcomes of the recently published roadmap on future directions for repository interoperability as well as an overview of the current status of the associations' work related to this topic, i.e. the initiative “Aligning Repository Networks”.

Linde, Peter, Eva Norling, Anette Pettersson, Lena Petersson, Kent Pettersson, Anna Stockmann, and Sofia Swartz. "Researchers and Open Data – Attitudes and Culture at Blekinge Institute of Technology." In New Avenues for Electronic Publishing in the Age of Infinite Collections and Citizen Science: Scale, Openness and Trust, 173-177. ELPUB. Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2015.

During March 2015, the Blekinge Institute of Technology library carried out an interview survey comprising around 36 senior researchers and postdocs mainly in engineering sciences, with the objective to get a picture of how research data is managed at BTH and to find out what the researcher attitudes are to sharing data. The survey showed that most researchers in the study were positive to sharing research data but lacked any experience of making data management plans and had little or no knowledge of data preservation or of sharing open data. Uncertainties about data ownership are also an issue.

Heikkilä, Harri. "Social Reading and eBooks." In New Avenues for Electronic Publishing in the Age of Infinite Collections and Citizen Science: Scale, Openness and Trust, 169-172. ELPUB. Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2015.

The success and mainstreaming of e-books is transforming not only the traditional/Gutenbergian idea of the book but also the previous idea of an e-book as mainly an enriched print book. In the new e-book concept, the nature of a book as an artifact is diminishing and disposition as a networked interface to the knowledge is rising. One of the most important emerging concepts is the social reading, which means reading acts while connected to the other people. Social reading is a new and not very well defined area of reading practices. In addition to the traditional reading together and discussing books person to person, social reading includes a large number of networked functions like sharing and receiving shared information. Research of this new phenomena is almost non existent, yet it is expected to be the next big thing in reading and in e-books. This study provides an overview of the history of social reading of printed books and then defines parallel features in the new digital reading activities. Research material consists of popular e-book software and services. The proposed categorization of social reading is based on content analysis of properties that were found in those services. This report claims that social reading functionalities are manifestations of the social needs that have existed during and even before the paper book; digital time enables re-emerging of some of those features, but in a different manner.

Borst, Timo. "Sustainable Software as a Building Block for Open Science." In New Avenues for Electronic Publishing in the Age of Infinite Collections and Citizen Science: Scale, Openness and Trust, 31-36. ELPUB. Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2015.

In the context of Open Science, almost every ‘traditional’ research activity and output has been affected and transformed by means of web based technology. New forms of research output have emerged, among them software as an important means and method for data driven science. But how can software be treated as scholarly work, and how can it be integrated into a digital research infrastructure? The paper depicts software development related to Open Science and points out some future directions for software to become part of a sustainable research infrastructure.

Olsbo, Pekka. "The Roadmap to Finnish Open Science and Research." In New Avenues for Electronic Publishing in the Age of Infinite Collections and Citizen Science: Scale, Openness and Trust, 181-184. ELPUB. Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2015.

Finland published its open science roadmap at the end of November 2014. This roadmap is based on the work of the Open Science and Research Initiative (ATT), a cross-administrative initiative established by the Ministry of Education and Culture. The goal of this initiative is to promote open science and availability of information. Exploration of recent developments of open access in the EU shows that Finland is not among the leading countries in the EU. This paper focuses on the practical action plan of this roadmap and describes how the weakest part of Finnish open science, green open access is to be lifted at international top level.

Sacco, Owen, and John Breslin. "Towards Privacy Aware Social Semantic Digital Libraries." In New Avenues for Electronic Publishing in the Age of Infinite Collections and Citizen Science: Scale, Openness and Trust, 160-162. ELPUB. Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2015.
Heyvaert, Pieter, Tom De Nies, Joachim Van Herwegen, Miel Vander Sande, Ruben Verborgh, Wesley De Neve, Erik Mannens, and Rik Van de Walle. "Using EPUB 3 and the Open Web Platform for Enhanced Presentation and Machine-Understandable Metadata for Digital." In New Avenues for Electronic Publishing in the Age of Infinite Collections and Citizen Science: Scale, Openness and Trust, 37-46. ELPUB. Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2015.

Various methods are needed to extract information from current (digital) comics. Furthermore, the use of different (proprietary) formats by comic distribution platforms causes an overhead for authors. To overcome these issues, we propose a solution that makes use of the EPUB 3 specification, additionally leveraging the Open Web Platform to support animations, reading assistance, audio and multiple languages in a single format, by using our JavaScript library comicreader.js. We also provide administrative and descriptive metadata in the same format by introducing a new ontology: Dicera. Our solution is complementary to the current extraction methods, on the one hand because they can help with metadata creation, and on the other hand because the machine-understandable metadata alleviates their use. While the reading system support for our solution is currently limited, it can offer all features needed by current comic distribution platforms. When comparing comics generated by our solution to EPUB 3 textbooks, we observed an increase in file size, mainly due to the use of images. In future work, our solution can be further improved by extending the presentation features, investigating different types of comics, studying the use of new EPUB 3 extensions, and by incorporating it in digital book authoring environments.

Chumbe, Santiago, Roddy MacLeod, and Brian Kelly. "We Should Not Light an Open Access Lamp and then Hide it Under a Bushel!" In New Avenues for Electronic Publishing in the Age of Infinite Collections and Citizen Science: Scale, Openness and Trust, 102-112. ELPUB. Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2015.

The rapid growth of hybrid journals in the last few years has seen an unfortunate side effect: the majority of Open Access (OA) articles published in those journals cannot be recognized as OA beyond the publishers' websites, or by the discovery services used by researchers to access full-text articles. This reality has been demonstrated in the literature and solutions have been proposed. This paper explains the causes behind the problem, examines each of the proposed solutions, discusses the few implementations made with those solutions, and estimates whether the potential benefits merit the efforts required to implement the available solutions. Each of the solutions is analyzed from standardization and pragmatic perspectives. In particular, we critically analyze the solution proposed by NISO (RP-22-2015), and compare it with the solution offered by the JEMO project, which is based on using metadata elements from namespaces and XML schemas already being used by publishers. The contribution presents a number of case studies which show that research published as OA ends up erroneously being labelled as non-OA on the electronic services used by the end-user, when one of the components of the supply and delivery chain for e-journals fails to include OA information in its metadata. Furthermore, the case studies demonstrate that publishers of hybrid journals should not be the only ones being answerable for the problem. In fact, during the study, some publishers were actually not allowed to enable OA identification, at the article level, by key components of the supply chain. In those case studies, we worked with a sample of publishers that implemented the JEMO solution. From those experiences we draw answers to the main question of this presentation: which solution should be used to enable OA discovery from hybrid journals? What becomes apparent is that publishers are prepared and willing to implement any of the available solutions in their publishing workflow. The paper proposes that the simplest option is the best solution to provide standardized means to identify OA at the article level.